Shemya photos, page 3 (Post-WWII)
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1. This photo was taken around August, 1975. There are several different species of seals that visit Shemya, in addition to the Sea Lions that find their way here every year about this time. I managed to slip into the water while taking some of these photos...cold! (George L. Smith, Coord T5)
2. While the birds occupy the upper lofts of these rocky apartments, the Sea Lions prefer the ground level. The Sea Lions show up in late summer, the males stake out their turf, battle for a harem, do their thing, then take off again for another year. There were many such living arrangements around the north and east end of the Island. The white colored rocks are not whitewashed, but are so colored from bird droppings deposited from above. August or September, 1975. (Coord T4) (George L Smith)
3. Now here's a whale of a tale..or is it a tail of a whale? This guy beached on Shemya's shores one day for some unknown reason. 1975-1976 (George L. Smith, Coord W9)
4. There were numerous dogs on the Island. One of them seems to have always been named "Boozer." The Boozer on duty when I was there apparently died of alcohol poisoning. That's me on the left, Mike Segebarth on the right. 1975-1976 (George L Smith, Coord S5)
5. Having been stationed at Minot, North Dakota for over 4 years and having had to wear what I would define as a real parka  while stationed there, the Shemya version wasn't quite as elaborate or warm by comparison. Even though the wind would blow over 100 mph and we would get a fair amount of snow, the temperatures never seemed to get below around 28 degrees Fahrenheit. Nevertheless, the Shemya standard issue parka in 1975 wasn't quite up to par. (George L Smith)
6. While on a clear day you couldn't necessarily see forever, you could see Agattu Island just to the West of Shemya. If there were a dotted line drawn in the water, you could also see the dateline about 100 miles or so on the other side. (P. Gallaher, Coord A7)
7. This picture is the same as the one above, after the "fog monster" departed. Some of the Island’s older radomes and radars can be seen in the background. (George Blood. Coord J5)
8. This aircraft didn't survive. "Rivet Ball," otherwise known as "Nancy Rae" then later renamed to "Wanda Belle," Model JKC-135A/RC-135S, Tail # 59-1491, crashed at Shemya AFS during landing operations on the 13th of January, 1969 at around 12:30am. Jim Alspaugh put about 500 hours behind the throttle of this modified KC-135 in 1965. There were major concerns about a North-South wind with an East-West runway! For photo of Wanda Bell taxiing, click here. (George L. Smith. Coord B8).
9. The C5s and C-141s were our supply workhorses. Shemya has a 10,000 foot grooved runway which made landingings a little less hazardous under some of Shemya's foulest weather. Transported Power Station Components for Cobra Dane. (George L. Smith, Coord L10).
10. Here's another shot of America’s old protective electronic “eyes,” the FPS-17 radar antennas. Taken around 1977. (George Blood, Coord L3)
Walk-way to GE Radomes, No Fog! [George Blood] Walk-way to GE Radomes, No Fog! [George Blood]
The Remains of JKC-135A (RC-135S) Recon Aircraft on Shemya. [George L. Smith] The Remains of JKC-135A (RC-135S) Recon Aircraft on Shemya. [George L. Smith]
C5 Landing at Shemya AFS. [George L. Smith] C5 Landing at Shemya AFS. [George L. Smith]
Shemya's FPS-17 Radar Antenntas. [George Blood] Shemya's FPS-17 Radar Antenntas. [George Blood]
Seals Around Shemya! [George L. Smith] Seals Around Shemya! [George L. Smith]
Birds & Sea Lions Abound Around Shemya! [George L. Smith] Birds & Sea Lions Abound Around Shemya! [George L. Smith]
A Dead Whale Beaches on Shemya. [George L. Smith] A Dead Whale Beaches on Shemya. [George L. Smith]
George L. Smith (L), Mike Segebarth (R), Shemya 1975-76. [George L. Smith] George L. Smith (L), Mike Segebarth (R), Shemya 1975-76. [George L. Smith]